Category Archives: Family-arity

Father of a Weirdo

Standard

 

My son is a weirdo, and that depends hugely on your level of self-consciousness. He does weird noises when he is uncomfortable, he wears hats cause they make him feel safe, and he is obsessed with wearing pjs. They need to be included into our daily program, so if I were to say “first we go to the nursery, then mom will pick you up, and you will go home,” he will quickly reply “and I can wear my pf8de9d05b50fe9828313a4044fcda665ajama?”

If a drop of water comes on his t-shirt, including a tear if he were crying, he throws a fit to have it changed, cause anything wet irritates him, but he is obsessed with having baths, sometimes even twice a day, the irony I know! He doesn’t know how to deal with attention, so he makes sounds, faces, gestures and grunts in public. He is a 4 year old, acting like a 4 year old. I find myself at times pressuring him to stop acting like so, and the words leaving my lips, impulsively, are “stop that, or people will laugh at you”.

Reflecting back at my childhood, a lesson I learned sometime around high school, and one as old as the hills: trendiness is coinage in popularity Read the rest of this entry

The Sunrise

Standard

A few days ago we returned from our annual, short, uninterrupted, family trip. It’s a trip we take around this time of the year, where it is only father, mother and children. No sights to see, no family to visit. This year we went to a resort that faces the Indian Ocean eastwards. A scarcity, since most Middle Eastern cities face the west or north. Waking up before dawn is common when the winter sun rises later, and especially since all five of us were in one room. We made our way to the beach to watch the sunrise, something that in my 32 years of life I saw only once some 14 years ago. For the rest of the day I took my children everywhere they wanted, and did anything they felt like doing. We slid down water slides and jumped over waves in the cold sea. We took a short boat ride, we played arcades in the kid’s area, we ate junk food for lunch and enjoyed sugary drinks poolside. Everything they wanted, we did.

For our children, this is considered somewhat of a big deal, since my wife and I try to raise our kids on what is less; of everything except emotion and attention, and quite honestly, for kids, what more do they need? Yes, this can dwell on the boarders of extremism, and perhaps knocks gently on the doors of stinginess, but generally speaking, those who have less in life are the ones that are happier Read the rest of this entry

The Last of The Grandparents (Part I)

Standard

The Day My Palestine Died

My grandparents were born in Palestine. All four of them. They lived there, got married there and had children there. They lived through the British Mandate of the region, revolted on it, got beaten down, witnessed the migration of Jews, saw the Jews revolt on the British Mandate, saw the British Mandate allowing it to happen and then withdrawing from Palestine. It was too theatrical to be considered a coincidence.

They never ceased talking about it though. Throughout their lives, Palestine was always on their minds. They would talk like they left yesterday, and that they will return tomorrow. I would hear them always say “May God return us to our homeland in peace.” Read the rest of this entry

Dear Karam,

Standard

I want you to know that your parents have tried everything they could so you do not end up being born in Iran. Nothing racists towards the country, but they felt being a Palestinian with a Syrian issued Travel Document born in Tehran will be a limiting factor to your movement.

We live in tough times with a lot of nations playing a game that most of us don’t understand, but leave us from that; I don’t really understand politics to care much about it. See your maternal grandfather, may God have mercy on his soul, had faith in the nation. When a certain lion was forming the Ministry of Electricity in the country your grandfather lived in after being dispersed from Palestine, your grandfather’s position at that time was to facilitate the planning done by a German company to the laying of the country’s electric power grid. They were so impressed with your grandfather’s capabilities that they offered him a position in their plant in Germany. A government employee to the Ministry of Electricity didn’t make much in those days, but he refused to leave, because he had faith. Read the rest of this entry